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Capacity Strengthening

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Founded by Jeffrey P. Koplan and international colleagues in 2001, the International Association of National Public Health Institutes (IANPHI) connects and strengthens the government agencies responsible for public health. IANPHI improves the world's health by leveraging the experience and expertise of its member institutes to build robust public health systems. Its Emory University Office, in partnership with its membership Secretariat in Helsinki, Finland, leads capacity building projects in over 35 countries around the world. It is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and other donors, its 84 members, and private-sector partners. Learn more about IANPHI’s work in China with the China CDC.

Education

William Horton, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2007 EGHI Seed Grant to establish the Emory Center for Medical Outreach and Education (ECMOE). The goal of the ECMOE was to provide a framework for integrating international medical education with the establishment of self-sustaining, high-caliber spine centers in low- and middle-resource countries that demonstrate appropriate need and infrastructure.

Haian Fu, Professor of Pharmacology at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2008 EGHI Seed Grant to bring Dr. Zi-Jian Li, a postdoctoral fellow at Peking University, to Emory University as part of a research exchange program. Dr. Li spent one year collaborating with Dr. Fu on his pharmaceutical research. After he returned to China, Dr. Li continues to help facilitate research collaborations between Emory and Peking University.

Environmental Health

Eri Saikawa, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Emory College, received a 2012 EGHI Seed Grant to conduct a project entitled Understanding the Health Burden in Tibetan Households. The primary goal of the study is to better understand the current indoor air quality status in the Tibetan region and to shed light on the mitigation policy options within the region.

Justin Remais, Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and an EGHI Faculty Distinction Fund Awardee, received a 2012 EGHI Seed Grant to conduct a project entitled Epidemiology and Environmental Transmission of Cryptosporidium in China.

Justin Remais, Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and an EGHI Faculty Distinction Fund Awardee, is leading a China-based project entitled Models for Improving Surveillance of Environmentally Mediated Infectious Diseases. The project, funded by the NIH, aims to develop advanced numerical and statistical methods to optimize infectious disease surveillance programs in the presence of environmental heterogeneity.

Justin Remais, Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and an EGHI Faculty Distinction Fund Awardee, is leading a China-based project entitled The Influence of Environmental Change on Parasite Diffusion through Human, Invertebrate, and Environmental Pathways. The project aims to comprehensively quantify and assess the role of diffusive processes in governing parasite transmission, with a specific focus on how anthopogenic change can modify diffusion parameters, thereby influencing transmission.

Justin Remais, Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and an EGHI Faculty Distinction Fund Awardee, is leading a China-based project entitled Flood-related Pathogen Risk Models Appropriate for Low-resource Settings. The objective of this project is to improve the mechanistic understanding of and predictive abilities for dynamic microbiological risks following a flood event in low- and middle-income countries.

Linking Active and Passive Surveillance Data to Generate a Longitudinal Dataset of Schistosomiasis in Sichuan Province, China, 2011 Student Field Scholar Project.

Infectious Diseases

Yun Wang, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pathology at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2008 EGHI Seed Grant to conduct a project entitled Antimicrobial Resistance Study: Project ICARE China. The project’s primary purpose was to generate data that will assist microbiologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, and infection control practitioners in understanding and controlling antimicrobial resistance in the healthcare setting.

Chinglai Yang, faculty at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2007 EGHI Partnership Program Grant to develop a Consortium on Avian Influenza Control: An International Partnership on H5N1 Influenza Vaccine Development.

Maternal and Child Health

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Polymorphisms of Genes Encoding their Metabolic Enzymes, and Risk of Neural Tube Defects, 2012 Student Field Scholar Project.

Reynaldo Martorell, Emory Global Health Institute Senior Fellow and Professor of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, received an EGHI Partnership Program Grant in 2008 to develop a Global Research Network Focusing on Early Life and Long-Term Human Function in China.

Joseph Cubells, Associate Professor at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2008 EGHI Partnership Program Grant to conduct the first phase of the project entitled Genetic Epidemiology of Autism in China: Phase I.

Mental Health

Barbara Rothbaum, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the Emory University School of Medicine, received a 2012 EGHI Seed Grant to conduct a project entitled Establishing a Collaborative Global Mental Health Center between Shanghai Mental Health Center and Emory University.

Michael Phillips, Emory Global Health Institute Senior Fellow and visiting faculty at the Emory University School of Medicine, has spent the last 25 years conducting mental health research in China.

Tobacco Control

The Emory Global Health Institute - China Tobacco Control Partnership (GHI-CTP) was established in 2008 by a five-year grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Jeffrey P. Koplan, Vice President for Global Health at Emory University, is the principal investigator for this program. The goal of the GHI-CTP is to reduce the health, social, environmental, and economic burdens of tobacco use in China. There are two main initiatives of the GHI-CTP, 1) Tobacco-Free Cities Program and 2) Programs of Excellence.